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The Northern Neck of Virginia Historical Society

Preserving the history and traditions of "the Athens of America," cradle of our nation's democracy

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The John Paul Hanbury Award recognizes significant examples of best practices in the preservation and restoration of Northern Neck properties of architectural and/or historic interest.

 

Download a copy of brochure

Download the Application

 

Please visit the links above for information on nominating properties.

Deadline for nominations - August 15.

 

For additional information, you may email nnvhs@live.com.

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2015 John Paul Hanbury Residential Property Award

 

Courtney- Settle House, Kinsale, VA

Owners, O. J. Hickox & Phyliss Herring

 

The Courtney-Settle House, circa 1880, was built by Confederate Veteran Lewis Walton Courtney (1842-1900) of Kinsale. Upon Courtney's move to Mundy Point, Paul and Jennie Settle purchased the home. The Settles were associated with the Hardwick Hotel that stood across the street from the Courtney-Settle House, on the site of the present-day post office.

O. J. Hickox and his wife, Phyllis Herring, purchased the Courtney-Settle House in 1997, and immediately began restoring the T-shaped, two story frame farmhouse. The house had been the victim of some former repairs with disastrous consequences. With the owners prompt attention to the deteriorating foundation and careful preservation of original features, the Courtney-Settle House contributes to the appeal of the quaint village of Kinsale.

 

 

 


 

2015 John Paul Hanbury Residential Property Award

 

Weekends, Kilmarnock, VA

Owners, Terri Wesselman and Julien Patterson

 

Weekends, a 1904 Sears House, came to Kilmarnock by steamboat. A very similar model was featured in a 1908 Sears catalogue for $1,764.  

 

This property was saved from destruction and re-purposed, with outstanding restoration practices, as a retail store featuring fine clothing for men and women. The two year long restoration involved close attention to preserving and restoring the fine features of this grand house.

 

 


 

2014 John Paul Hanbury Residential Property 

 

Islington Cottage, Warsaw, VA

Owner, Pat Pugh

 

Islington Cottage on the Rappahannock River near Warsaw is part of the Islington tract of 1450 acres received as a grant from the King by William Underwood in 1650.

Walter Ratcliffe became the owner in the 1930’s and had Islington Cottage constructed on th
e farm as a summer home in 1938. The Cottage was built by carpenter Emory Eli Packett, the paternal grandfather of the current owner, Pat Pugh. The once upon a time summer cottage underwent major refurbishment to become a full time residence. Islington Cottage is now occupied full time by Mr. Packett’s great-granddaughter, Hillary Kent and her husband Ryan.

 


 

2014 John Paul Hanbury Residential Property Award

 

Locust Farm, Kinsale, VA

Owners, Al and Margaret Withers

 

 Locust Farm bears evidence of having been built in 1717, or maybe earlier. Legible on an oak floor beam is the inscribed name "John Heath" and "Liverpool, England", with the date "1717"."

 

During a recent restoration, prompted by major water damage caused by a waterline break in the heating system, owners Al and Margaret Withers paid careful attention to every detail to retain the historical character of this charming early brick farmhouse and  its' furnishings. The excellent restoration of both the house and furnishings bears evidence that the expertise for such meticulous work is available in the Northern Neck. The Withers will gladly share the names of all contractors involved, so others may benefit.

 

 


 

 

2013 John Paul Hanbury Commercial Property Award

 

Objects, Irvington, VA

Owners, Terri Wesselman and Julien Patterson

 

Objects is a delightful art gallery located in Irvington, VA, that began in the 1930's as a Sinclair gas station, with a drive through oil change. It later became a barber shop, with an addition serving as the Irvington Beauty Parlor. The left section was once owned by the Carters, and was the longtime home of Jim and Pat Carter Real Estate. The back section was once used by an artist as a studio. I

 

n May 2013, current owners Terri Wesselman and her husband, Julien Patterson, completed the renovation and restoration of the three section building, bringing the structure back to its former historic character. The front façade was redone to recall the former three separate businesses, using materials for repair appropriate to the age of the property and preserving the building's continuum over time. Interior renovations include a first time central air conditioning and heating system, updated energy efficient windows, a kitchen and two bathrooms.

 

 

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2013 John Paul Hanbury Residential Property Award

 

"Roanoke", Heathsville, VA

Owner, Mason Brent


Roanoke has been in the Brent Family since 1852, when Andrew Jackson Brent (1827-1889) arranged the purchase of the farm from the estate of Mottram Ball Cralle. The original story & half west wing (right) was built circa 1760. The center section was built prior to 1850.

 

The newest addition (left) was designed and built to match the original 1760 house. The John Paul Hanbury Residential Property Award was presented to Mason Brent in recognition of the outstanding dedication of Mason and his family for the ongoing preservation, rehabilitation and restoration of Roanoke.

 



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2012 John Paul Hanbury Commercial Property Award

 

"The Inn at Montross", Montross, VA

Owners, Beth & Rod Parker and Rhys & Nancy Weakley

 

The Inn at Montross, a long-time Northern Neck landmark, is situated on property that has changed hands many times since the 1600’s. The present day Inn was built in the 1800’s on the site of an earlier 17th century tavern. A brick wall in the basement/pub area is believed to date to the late 1600’s. The three story structure has survived many roles during its lifetime, including as a tavern, hotel, restaurant, private residence, boarding house, apartments and even a school.

 

In 2010, its current owners began a massive renovation and restoration resulting in beautifully redesigned interior dining areas and guest rooms, and an exterior face lift.